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Medical Interpreting Immersion Jacksonville

Anatomical Model of the Human Body

Body Language: It’s All in the Lungs registration open now

Dates and times: April 14-May 25, 2016

Complete assignments weekly, according to your own schedule. The average time required to complete all assignments is 15-20 hours over six weeks.

Cost: $50

Facilitator: Bridget Sabatke

Description: This course covers how the lungs work, asthma, pneumonia, and lung cancer. More information>>

Program Requirements:

  • High-speed internet access
  • Ability to watch YouTube videos
  • Ability to video-record your work for self-analysis

Who should register: American Sign Language interpreters working in healthcare or education settings

The CATIE Center at St. Catherine University is an approved RID sponsor for continuing education activities. This activity is approved for .75 or 1.0 professional studies CEUs, and assumes some knowledge of the topic. RID CMP and ACET logo

Register today!

Body Language Modules & Sample

BodyLanguage-featureThe Body Language series is six separate courses. Each is six weeks long, and focuses on a specific system or topic commonly discussed in healthcare settings.

To learn what modules are currently being offered,

please click here.

If you are interested in the Body Language Series, but not sure you want to invest the time and money, check out the sample that we have available.  You can access a sample of the Cardio Workout offering and see what the course has to offer.

Click here to access the sample.

Once you are at the login page, simply hit the “Login as Guest” button, and you will be able to view the resources.

National Symposium on Healthcare Interpreting - 2015

Learning from 2015 National Symposium on Healthcare Interpreting

The National Symposium on Healthcare Interpreting took place on June 3-6  2015.

Karen Malcolm, Doug Bowen-Bailey, and Judy Shepherd-Kegl

Our blogging team of Karen Malcolm, Doug Bowen-Bailey, and Judy Shepherd-Kegl

Three people helped to document what is taking place through our web site.  Karen Malcolm, Doug Bowen-Bailey, and Judy Shepherd-Kegl shared insights and photos from the workshops and plenary sessions.  Please visit the blog to see their perspectives on the Symposium.

For program information, visit the CATIE Center website.

About this program

The National Symposium on Healthcare Interpreting was developed to advance the quality of sign language interpreters who work in healthcare settings, thereby improving the access that deaf and deaf-blind people have to communication regarding their health. The symposium aims to improve understanding of the complex role of interpreters, including the linguistic, cultural, social and ethical challenges inherent in these settings. In addition, the symposium will increase interpreters’ awareness of the barriers faced by individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind and hard of hearing when accessing health care and provide strategies for addressing those barriers.

The target audience for this program is experienced interpreters working in healthcare settings.

History of healthcare interpreting at St. Kate’s

In 1983, St. Catherine University started the nation’s first and only interpreter education program with a focus on preparing American Sign Language/English interpreters to work in health care related industries. From 2000-2005 (with federal, state and private grants) St. Kate’s developed a series of educational resources for interpreters on CD and DVD, many of which focused on medical interpreting. In 2003, under a Minnesota state grant, St. Kate’s launched medicalinterpreting.org (now HealthcareInterpreting.org) to function as a portal of entry for interpreters searching for medical resources.

For more information, visit the CATIE Center website.

Livestream Workshop: Language Deprivation Syndrome

Live streaming is available! Just go here before the event starts: http://www.brown.edu/ web/livestream/

Title: Language Deprivation Syndrome

By Sanjay Gulati, M.D., Harvard Medical School

When: Tuesday, April 1, 2014 from 6 PM to 7:30 PM

Where: Friedman Auditorium, Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101
Brown University, 190-194 Thayer Street, Providence, RI 02906

Hosted by the American Sign Language Studies program at the Center for Language Studies and the Program for Liberal Medical Education.

Description:
The single greatest risk faced by Deaf people is inadequate exposure to a usable first language. Dr. Gulati will review recent research which validates the anatomical basis and time course of the critical period for first language acquisition, and which shows the risks to the development of empathic abilities among children who are language-deprived.

About the Lecturer:
Sanjay Gulati, M.D. is a Deaf child and adolescent psychiatrist who works at the Deaf & Hard of Hearing Service at Cambridge Hospital and the Deaf & Hard of Hearing Program at Children’s Hospital, Boston. He consults to a variety of Deaf-related programs. His primary area of research interest is the effects of language deprivation. He is co-editor of “Mental Health Care for Deaf People” (Erlbaum, 2003) and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Accessibility
The lecture will be ASL interpreted and CART services will be provided. Friedman Auditorium is ADA accessible.

Contact: For more information, contact ASL@brown.edu

A Picture of books on a desk in a library

Certificate in Healthcare Interpreting 2014-2015

Program Announcement
Certificate in Healthcare Interpreting 2014-2015

The American Sign Language Interpreter Education Department (ASLIE) at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID)  is happy to announce the “Certificate in Healthcare Interpreting” program 2014-2015.   This program is designed in a blended format consisting of a consolidated, week-long face to face classroom and online learning components.  The overall aim of this certificate program is to provide specialized professional development to ASL/English interpreters in the area of healthcare interpreting. It promises to employ innovative teaching strategies/methodologies by nationally recognized healthcare experts combined with practical application within healthcare environments. This announcement serves as an invitation to explore the program further and to seek application if you so desire. We invite you to look at our website www.rit.edu/ntid/heathcareinterpreting   to learn more about this exciting cutting edge program and the application process.

Kathy Miraglia, M.S., C.S.C.
Healthcare Program Coordinator/Instructor
American Sign Language & Interpreter Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf/ Rochester Institute of Technology
52 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, New York  14623
585-475-5441, Fax: 585-475-5269
kamnss@rit.edu

A Bible for Healthcare Interpreters? A new resource for our profession (Part 3 of 3)

English Version

The English and ASL versions have similar content but are not direct translations of each other. The goal in offering both is to provide more complete access to the information.

HealthcareBookFormatsThis is the third of a three-part series reviewing the book, Introduction to Healthcare for Interpreters and Translators by Ineke Crezee.  This segment focuses on the pros and cons of the different available formats.  Part 1 features an interview with the author and an understanding of the motivation for writing this volume.  Part 2 focuses on the actual content delivered in the book and how it can be used.

The Upshot

Introduction to Healthcare for Interpreters and Translators by Ineke Crezee is an extremely useful resource for interpreters working in healthcare settings and worth the $54 to purchase a copy.  Crezee has done the field a favor by distilling relevant information about healthcare settings and practice into a well-organized and accessible format that interpreters and translators will find invaluable to have as an ongoing reference.

Available from John Benjamins and GooglePlay.

The Formats

This part of my review focuses on how this book can be most practical for interpreters.  As I mentioned in the the first part of this series, I had the opportunity to review both the paperback version ($54 from John Benjamins) and the scanned eBook ($42.66 from GooglePlay.)  The other versions available are hardbound ($149 from John Benjamins) and eBook which is currently advertised as $149.  Note the term “currently” as I contacted the publisher about this price and learned that John Benjamins is developing their own eBook platform and plan to release their books at the price of the paperback if one is available.

Strengths and Drawbacks

Both the versions I reviewed were organized in a very logical manner and include an extensive index to allow interpreters and translators to find specific items quickly.  For example, if you were called to an angiogram, you could immediately ascertain that relevant information is to be found on pages 179 and 211. The layout of the text in both of these formats uses frequent lists and tables which make it easy to scan through the book to find relevant information—very helpful.

A paperback is more susceptible to being damaged over time. During my interview with the author, she stated that interpreters in New Zealand carried around dog-eared copies of the book; signs of use, but also signs of wear.  In addition, for a book to contain this much information in a well-organized format, it cannot be small.  The dimensions of the paperback: 9.5” x 6.75” x .875”. (That’s 24 mm x 17 mm x 2.2mm for you metric users.)  So, it is not a small book to carry around, but if you prefer a paper copy, it is one worth having and caring for.

The advantages of an eBook include it can simply be carried with you on a tablet or a phone.  For those of you on a budget (which probably includes all of us) it is hard not to notice that it is less expensive to purchase the eBook from GooglePlay than to buy the paperback or eBook from John Benjamins.

The GoogleBook version does have limitations.  It does not have flowing text.  This means that you cannot change how large the text is on the page.  Essentially, you are only able to see an image of each book page, so it works well on a tablet with its larger screen, but the pages would be too small on a phone to be functional.  Additionally, the search function in an eBook reader on an iOS device (iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch) does not work—nor can you take notes on topics the way it is possible in other eReaders like iBooks. The search function does, however, work on Android devices.

(As a workaround, the book does have an extensive index that can be manually searched and then the page number quickly found.  Not as fast as the Search function, but as effective as using the index in the printed version.)

When I first wrote this review, the version of the book did not include the images shared in the printed version which is of particular value for interpreters who work with a visual language like ASL.  That glitch has been corrected.  As one of the benefits of an eBook platform -I was prompted to re-download the book when I opened it on my iPad after the change had been made.

Regarding the possibility of having flowing text that can be re-sized and thus more useful on the smaller screen of a phone, I received this comment from Pieter Lamers, production manager for John Benjamins:

The Google Play edition is based upon the PDF version. It will be searchable but not have reflowable text. We are looking into adding ePub versions of select titles. The nature of ePub makes this (reflowable) format less trustworthy and thus unsuitable for most of our academic publications.

This is a challenge for publishers.  The state of the digital publishing

Recommendations

The price of the book means that most interpreters will need to give serious consideration when deciding whether or not to purchase it.  For those working in healthcare settings, I believe it is a worthwhile investment in the quality of our practice.  The amount of time it saves us in doing our research on a given setting is definitely worth $54.  Whether or not to go with the paperback version or the eBook really depends on how you use technology—though the trends in publishing are in the direction of digital books and if you have a tablet, this might be a good eBook to add to your library.

Personally, I will be using the eBook version because my tablet has already become an indispensable part of my practice for interpreting in healthcare settings. I also have it on my phone, and though the text is small on the phone’s screen, it is still legible to these 44-year-old eyes. So, having the eBook allows me to bring an incredibly valuable resource that I am able to navigate through quickly without it carrying any more weight.  It also means that I can more effectively prep even for the last minute assignments.   While waiting for the patient to be seen, I can review the relevant chapter to be more prepared for providing the highest quality service to both providers and patients.

Reference:

Crezee, I.  2013.  Introduction to Healthcare for Interpreters and Translators.  Amsterdam:  John Benjamins.

Ordering information retrieved on November 11, 2013 from http://www.benjamins.com/#catalog/books/z.181/main

A Bible for Healthcare Interpreters? A new resource for our profession (Part 2 of 3)

English Version

The English and ASL versions have similar content but are not direct translations of each other. The goal in offering both is to provide more complete access to the information.

hc-book-contentsThis is the second of a three-part series reviewing the book, Introduction to Healthcare for Interpreters and Translators by Ineke Crezee.  This segment focuses on the content of the book.  Part 1 features an interview with the author and an understanding of the motivation for writing this volume.  Part 3 focuses on the pros and cons of the different formats of the book.

The Upshot

Introduction to Healthcare for Interpreters and Translators by Ineke Crezee is an extremely useful resource for interpreters working in healthcare settings and worth the $54 to purchase a copy.  Crezee has done the field a favor by distilling relevant information about healthcare settings and practice into a well-organized and accessible format that interpreters and translators will find invaluable to have as an ongoing reference.

Available from John Benjamins and GooglePlay.

A Guided Tour

In thinking about this text, I liken it to a guidebook for interpreters working in healthcare settings.  If you were planning a trip to a foreign country, a recommendation would probably be to get a dependable guidebook to help you navigate unfamiliar territory. Similarly this book was written at the request of Ineke Crezee’s interpreting students who wanted a guide to the healthcare settings in which they were not experienced.  So, rather than thinking about this as simply a text book for those of us interested in interpreting in healthcare, I find it more apt to think of it as a resource that we can carry with us as support in our professional journey—useful whether it is our first trip into this territory or one of many.

The Contents

The book is divided into three sections.

Part I focuses on “Interpreting” and shares more general thoughts on interpreting in general, the need and requirements for interpreting in healthcare settings, considerations on how culture shapes the work interpreters do in healthcare and how patients perceive the healthcare experience, and a framework for preparing for medical terminology.

Part II focuses more specifically on “Interpreting in healthcare settings” and gives some incites on the different types of settings and staff that interpreters might encounter, including the general categories of:

  • primary physicians/general practitioners,
  • outpatient clinics and specialist clinics,
  • hospitals,
  • Emergency Departments/ERs,
  • informed consent,
  • Pre-operative and post-operative procedures,
  • Intensive Care,
  • Obstetrics,
  • Child Health,
  • Speech Language Therapy,
  • Mental Health, and
  • Oncology

Each of these sections contains a description of what might be expected in this setting.  Many, though not all, contain “some notes for interpreters and translators” which provide practical considerations to prepare for working in this setting.

Part III focuses in on “Healthcare specialties.”   These sections have a consistent format that includes:

  • Latin and Greek roots of terminology you might encounter,
  • Anatomy (structure) and Physiology (function) of parts of the body that might be important in these settings,
  • Health professionals who might be encountered in the setting,
  • Disorders that patients might present,
  • Common drugs used, and
  • Common investigations or treatments employed.

The specialties addressed are:

  1. Neurology,
  2. Cardiology,
  3. Respiratory system,
  4. Hematology,
  5. Orthopedics,
  6. Muscles and motor system,
  7. Sensory system,
  8. Immune and lymphatic system,
  9. Endocrine system,
  10. Digestive system,
  11. Urology and nephrology (The urinary system), and
  12. Reproductive system.

How to Use this Book

In the opening of Chapter 1, Crezee share a suggestion for how to use this book.  She writes, “Health interpreter educators may want to use the book as a course text, while health interpreters may want to use this book as a reference, checking briefly on anatomy, terminology and most commonly encountered conditions before leaving to interpret in a certain setting.”  I think these two options are helpful to think about.  For interpreter education, I believe the book could be a wonderful introduction to what is involved for interpreting in a healthcare setting.

A larger benefit, however, comes from it serving as a resource for working interpreters.  For interpreters (whether students or experienced practitioners), it is not a reasonable expectation for us to gain mastery over every healthcare setting we may find ourselves in. However, we can learn to use a resource like this as a way to effectively prepare for an assignment in a time-limited way.  Much of the information contained in the book exists on the internet, but Ineke Crezee has done the field of distilling the information into a much more concise and trustworthy form.  It allows interpreters to have a “temporary mastery” of the information—that is, we can review a chapter, commit the information to our short-term memory, and use it within a short period of time that allows us to be more effective in a particular setting.  Having the resource at our fingertips means we do not have to commit the time and effort that medical professionals need to gain a more “long-term mastery” for access at a variety of times and settings.

Choosing Formats

With such a potentially useful book, the next step is to determine which format best meets your needs and budget.  View the next entry in this review for some insights into the pros and cons of the different formats.

[button link=”http://healthcareinterpreting.org/bible-healthcare-interpreters-new-resource-profession-part-3-3/” type=”big” button color=”green”] Formats: Part 3 of Review[/button]

A Bible for Healthcare Interpreters? (Part 1)

A new resource for our profession

This is the first of a three-part series reviewing the book, Introduction to Healthcare for Interpreters and Translators by Ineke Crezee.  This segment features an interview with the author and an understanding of the motivation for writing this volume.  Part 2 focuses on the actual content delivered in the book and how it can be used.  Part 3 focuses on the pros and cons of the different available formats.

English Version

As interpreters in healthcare settings, we often are called into a variety of settings that we may not have in-depth knowledge about. It may be a meeting with a rheumatologist, an appointment with a cardiologist, or a visit to a edicrinologist. Unless we work in a setting with a large staff of interpreters, we work as generalists in a field full of specialists. Out of this reality comes a need for an effective resource to support the quality of our services for both patient and provider.

Ineke Crezee

Dr. Ineke Crezee – click on the picture for more information about her background and academic career

Ineke Crezee, an interpreter, translator, and educator based at Auckland University of Technology, responded to this need by writing Introduction to Healthcare for Interpreters and Translators. In a conversation about her motivation for the book, Ineke was clear that the idea was not her own. Instead, it came from her students: in 1996, a woman who worked as a Vietnamese-English interpreter approached Ineke and explained the type of book that she was looking for as an interpreter in healthcare settings. Ideally, the student thought, the book would be divided into different specialties with each chapter including:

  • an overview of the particular body system,
  • an explanation of Latin and Greek roots in medical terminology that might be employed,
  • common conditions and their signs and symptoms, and
  • procedures or tests that might be utilized in diagnosis and treatment.

After hearing this request, Ineke realized that there was no such book, and “that I’m going to have to write that book myself.”  So, she took on this challenge and originally self-published a book that became a constant companion to numerous interpreters and translators working in healthcare in New Zealand.

The success of the “Blue Book,” as it was called (because of its cover) by the community of interpreters and translators who used it, provided the foundation for the updated edition published by John Benjamins.

I did have the opportunity to talk with Ineke (once we figured out the challenge of scheduling across the international date line.  I don’t often get the chance to be in Monday talking to someone on Tuesday.)  What was clear in our conversation is that her primary mission with the book is to provide a practical resource – both for practitioners and educators – that will help raise the standard for interpreters and translators in healthcare settings.  I am excited to have the chance soon to review the book and assess how well this resource fulfills its mission.

I look forward to sharing that assessment – along with more insight from my conversation with Ineke Crezee – in the next few weeks.

What the Book Contains

Part    I.    Interpreting
Chapter 1. Introduction
Chapter 2. Interpreting in healthcare settings
Chapter 3. A word about culture
Chapter 4. Medical terminology

Part    II.    Interpreting in healthcare settings
Chapter 5. Primary physicians and General Practitioners
Chapter 6. Outpatient Clinics and specialist clinics
Chapter 7. Hospitals
Chapter 8. Emergency Departments or ERs
Chapter 9. Informed consent
Chapter 10. Pre-operative and post-operative procedures
Chapter 11. Intensive Care
Chapter 12. Obstetrics
Chapter 13. Child health
Chapter 14. Speech Language Therapy
Chapter 15. Mental health
Chapter 16. Oncology

Part    III.    Healthcare    Specialties
Chapter 17. Neurology: Nerves and the nervous system
Chapter 18. Cardiology: Heart and the circulatory system
Chapter 19. The respiratory system
Chapter 20. Hematology: Blood and blood disorders
Chapter 21. Orthopedics: The skeletal system
Chapter 22. Muscles and the motor system
Chapter 23. The sensory system
Chapter 24. The immune and lymphatic system
Chapter 25. The endocrine system
Chapter 26. The digestive system
Chapter 27. Urology and nephrology: The urinary system
Chapter 28. The reproductive system

Appendix
References
Index

[button link=”http://healthcareinterpreting.org/bible-healthcare-interpreters-new-resource-profession-part-2-3/” type=”big” button color=”green”] Contents: Part 2 of Review[/button]

Free Oncology Interpreter Training Program

The ASL Interpreter Oncology Training Program at the UCSD Moores Cancer Center is providing oncology training for ASL interpreters as one of the ways to improve the Deaf community’s access to health information and care.  We’re collaborating with RID, NAD, and Gallaudet University, plus regional agencies to help us to get the word out.

Deadline to join is Jan 31st.

Below you may find information regarding the program and where you can go to download the documents needed to be in the program.

The program consists of 13 cancer education modules offered in written English and ASL. There will be ~200 some oncology terms explained in ASL as well as example sentences so that participants may get a better understanding of how the terms are used in a real life situation. The program is all done by long-distance learning online, and requires only a few hours each month over about a year’s time.  It’s free while we’re evaluating it, and participants can apply to their local agency for independent continuing education study credits.  For those participants who complete the training program, we provide a certificate of completion and the first five to complete the program in each state will receive a $100 thank you, which they could then use to help pay for their independent study credits.

In order to become involved, you must download three documents from our website which can be found under “Forms to be completed PRIOR to starting the program”

http://deafhealth.ucsd.edu/rid/rid_forms.asp

Once filled out and sent to us, we can get you started. We will be sending out log in information after we receive your paperwork. Please note that all paperwork must be filled out, printed and snail mailed to us at the end of this email.

Feel free to pass the information along to others.  We hope to have 5 interpreters from each state so that the Deaf community of all states can benefit from this program.  We also have a Facebook group for those who want to be updated on the program’s progress.  It is titled “ASL Oncology Training Program for Interpreters” and can easily be found through a search. Here is also a link for you to go to in case you cannot access it immediately once typed in.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/UCSD-Cancer-Center-Deaf-Community-Outreach/143423742403690

UCSD Cancer Center
3855 Health Sciences Drive MC 0850
La Jolla, CA 92093

VP 858-768-0438

http://cancer.ucsd.edu/deafinfo